Hong Kong Women Filmmakers


Visualizing the Voices of Migrant Women Workers

Visualizing the Voices of Migrant Women Workers

A participatory video screening by Voices of Women Media and the Department of Sociology, University of Hong Kong

Sunday, August 6, 2017
3:00-4:30 PM
Para Site Education Room
Refreshments will be served

Para Site, Voices of Women Media (VOW), and the Department of Sociology at the University of Hong Kong are pleased to present 42 one-minute videos scripted and directed by domestic workers, asylum-seekers, and ethnic minorities who participated in video-making training as part of the Visualizing the Voices of Migrant Women Workers project.

The 2017 VOW-HKU Participatory Video Workshop Series included eight Sunday workshops from February to April 2017. Over forty participants were trained in video production, including storyboarding, scripting, assembling crews, shooting, art direction, location scouting, sound production, and editing. Each participant scripted and directed their own video, in addition to working on other participants’ crews as producers, art directors, gaffers, sound technicians, location scouts, camerapersons, and actors. Participants included members of the HKU Domestic Workers Empowerment Project, Enrich, Christian Action, Lensational, and Refugee Union. Continue reading


CFP: A Place To Call Our Own: Contesting and Constructing the Home in Independent Film and Media

CFP: A Place To Call Our Own: Contesting and Constructing the Home in Independent Film and Media

An area of multiple panels for the 2017 Film & History Conference:
Representing “Home”: The Real and Imagined Spaces of Belonging
November 1-November 5, 2017
The Hilton Milwaukee City Center
Milwaukee, WI (USA)

DEADLINE for abstracts: August 1, 2017

The idea of “home” has a complicated relationship to independent film and media. On the one hand, the home connotes a conventional familiarity that runs counter to the boundary-pushing spirit and go-it-alone ethos associated with the independent film and media world. On the other hand, building alternative sites of production, knowledge, and community constitutes a vital part of envisioning a media landscape beyond the mainstream.

This area asks presenters to consider how these two notions of home coexist within independent film and media. What have producers, distributors, exhibitors, and audiences done to make new spaces (both on and off-screen) that challenge norms and expand conceptions of creativity and belonging? How have these goals shifted within ever changing economic, industrial, and cultural contexts? In posing these questions, we ultimately seek to explore what it means to forge a potentially incongruous creation: a home for independence.

http://filmandhistory.org/conference/2017/2017_CFP_IndependentFilm.php

Continue reading


Film Review: ‘Our Time Will Come’ (China Film Insider)

Source: http://chinafilminsider.com/film-review-our-time-will-come/

Film Review: ‘Our Time Will Come’

• BY JONATHAN LANDRETH
• JUL 11, 2017

Every day while CFI’s Hollywood readers take in the business of the Chinese film industry, the actual movies can sometimes seem exotic or remote. But in major US cities, mainstream Chinese films are increasingly available: thanks to Wanda’s purchase of AMC and distributors like China Lion, they get American theatrical releases practically simultaneous to their premieres at home. Though they receive virtually no publicity outside the non-Chinese community, these films are more than worth seeking out by anyone serious about engaging the Chinese industry, understanding the Chinese sensibility and familiarizing themselves with China’s talent pool. Periodically, CFI will review and point readers in the direction of noteworthy US releases of contemporary commercial and independent Chinese titles.

‘Our Time Will Come.’ Photo: China Lion/Weibo.
Our Time Will Come (2017)
Grade: A

Continue reading


Doing Women’s Film and Television History IV: Calling the Shots – Then, Now, and Next

Doing Women’s Film and Television History IV:
Calling the Shots – Then, Now, and Next

University of Southampton, May 23 – 25, 2018
Organising team: Shelley Cobb, Linda Ruth Williams, and Natalie Wreyford

 

As researchers of the AHRC-funded project Calling the Shots: Women and Contemporary UK Film Culture 2000-2015 we are proud to host the fourth International Doing Women’s Film and Television History conference in association with the Women’s Film and Television History Network – UK/Ireland.

The focus for DWFTH-IV is predicated on the idea of the contemporary as an historical formation. The conference will offer a space to think about the interconnectedness of the past, present and future in feminist historiography and theory, as well as across all forms of women’s film culture and filmmaking. It will also consider women’s film and television histories and their relationships with the contemporary, framed and read historically, to reflect on our methodological, theoretical, ideological and disciplinary choices when researching and studying women and/in film and television. In addition to this theme, we are interested in proposals/panels on all topics related to women’s film and television history, from all eras and from all parts of the globe. We hope that DWFTH-IV will build on the successes of the previous conferences through new work on women, both historical and contemporary, and fresh thinking on what we mean by women’s film and television history.

Calling the Shots is producing important new research on women in cinema now, through interviews, data analysis and writing. We are finding and recording all the women who have been employed in six key roles in British film production since 2003. We are interviewing over 50 of these women thereby producing a record of their involvement and achievements. The scale and forensic detail of the project shows both what they have done and where they have been excluded. Since its inception, Calling the Shots has been affiliated with WFTHN-UK/Ireland, and in doing our research we continually reflect on how contemporary study both relies on historical precedents and develops new models for thinking and working historically, while being focused on the present.

Keynote speakers TBC
(The conference will include screenings with special guests, as well as sessions with film and television practitioners and other industry professionals.)

Papers are invited on any aspect of women’s work in, consumption of, and relationship with film and television. The following is an indicative (and by no means exhaustive) list of possible topics:

·      women’s film/TV historiography: filling gaps or changing history?

·      history formulated as in medias res: how do we do contemporary history, and what are the implications of thinking of the historical in this way?

·      methodologies: archive searches, data collection (uses, limitations, difficulties collecting); interviews with practitioners; creative/cultural industrial approaches

·       the impact of social, economic and industrial conditions (including industry regulation) on women’s roles and creative practices

·      new ways of doing textual analysis of women’s films (rethinking feminist theory?)

·      re-thinking women as ‘auteurs’ of film and television (directors, showrunners, producers, actors)

·      feminism & women’s film history; historicizing women’s film collectives of 1970s and 80s; feminist filmmaking today (and tomorrow?)

·      international and transnational contexts: connections, comparisons, collaborations, migration

·      crossing industry boundaries: film, television, theatre, radio, journalism, art, etc

·      practice-based research: directing, screenwriting, sound/set/costume design, etc

– the relationship between practice-based research and history

·      women audiences/viewers and women as fans

·      women campaigner/activists in film and television and for on-screen/off-screen change

·      women’s film criticism/women film critics

·      the uses of social media by women filmmakers/showrunners/actors/ critics/fans/campaigners etc

·      digitisation in women’s filmmaking and future histories

·      ‘women’s cinema’ as critical category in post-feminist contexts

·      women’s independent filmmaking and/versus women’s mainstream (or blockbuster) directing

·      changing the curriculum: critical canons, teaching & film programming; pedagogies of women’s film and television history; teaching feminist history and theory; including women’s film and television in core modules/classes

·      the relationship between film and television genres, their gendered affiliations and women’s involvement in their production

·      women practitioners’ negotiations of femininity and/or feminism in their working lives

·      the intersection of class, race, sexuality, disability and women both on screen and behind the camera

·      issues of archiving and preservation for women’s film and television

·      distribution and exhibition and broadcasting – finding and seeing women’s film and television

 

Proposals for twenty-minute presentations must include the title of the presentation, a 250-word abstract and a brief biography the author(s). Pre-constituted panels of three speakers may also be submitted, and should include a 250-word panel rationale statement, as well as individual abstracts. Proposals from both established scholars and early career researchers including postgraduate students are welcomed. Proposals should be submitted to dwfth4@gmail.com before the 3 November 2017. Participants will receive a response from the selection committee before 20 December 2017.

Calling the Shots: Women and Contemporary Film Culture in the UK, 2000-2015 is an AHRC funded research project, running from 2014-2018. The project team are: Dr Shelley Cobb (Southampton); Prof Linda Ruth Williams (Exeter); Dr Natalie Wreyford (Research Fellow, Southampton); Ania Ostrowska and Sarah Smyth (PhD candidates, Southampton). Further details of the project can be found at: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/cswf/
Further details on the Women’s Film and Television History Network – UK/Ireland can be found at: https://womensfilmandtelevisionhistory.wordpress.com


Invitation 13 July | Meet filmmakers Orgil Erdenebat from Mongolia ( Behind the Face,101min ) & Kal Ng from Hong Kong ( Nirvenue, 73min)

2017年七月十三號(星期四)7:30-10:00PM

PUFF 2017

新片上眏

PUFF 誠意請到導演 Orgil Erdenebat 由蒙古乌兰巴托親自來到香港介紹他的長片 首領的謀殺 及香港導演吳家龍來分享他的新作品我愛的第二十二個妳

Director Kal Ng (Nirvenue / 73min / HK) & Director Orgil Erdenebat ( Behind the Face / 101min / Mongolia ) will be in HK PUFF 2017 for their screenings ( 13 . 07 . 2017 ) this Thursday 7:30-10:00PM @ Mustard Seed by EEG,  Emperor Group Centre,  288 Hennessy Road, Hong Kong   www.puff-festival.org/films2017

7:00PM Pre-screening drinks  /

7:30-8:45PM  Nirvenue /

Q&A 8:45-9:30PM  /

9:30PM – 11PM Behind the Face ( or drinks next door )

Photo below : Mongolia capital Ulaanbaatar Parliament Square /  Photo from Behind the Face /  Photo from Nirvenue

http://www.puff-festival.org

PUFF is a registered Hong Kong non-profit organisation and 2017 events are sponsored by Mustard Seeds by Emperor Group , KAI , Visage One, ED Toddington, B Park Gallery & Experimenta Foundation.

This is a FREE event but please register by sending us your number of attendance   info@puff-festival.org

We need your support and donation to continue showing art house films and alternative video art.

 


Ann Hui’s Our Time Will Come abruptly pulled from Shanghai opening slot

Asia in Cinema

The Shanghai International Film Festival has abruptly replaced its opening film just one week before the start of its 20th edition (June 16-26).

Ann Hui’s Our Time Will Come (明月幾時有) was announced as the opening film during a splashy event held in Cannes on May 19th. The war drama was also announced as being included in the festival’s Golden Goblet competition.

On the 9th, the festival suddenly announced a new opening film – Bille August’s The ChineseWidow, starring Liu Yifei and Emile Hirsch – along with the rest of the Golden Goblet competition titles. Our Time Will Come is still part of the Golden Goblet competition, but it’s not known whether the film will have a public screening since the screening schedule has not been released to the public.

The previous announcement on the festival’s official website that included mention of Our Time Will Come

View original post 184 more words


Celebration of the Arts at HKU with The Shaw Foundation

Celebration of the Arts at HKU with The Shaw Foundation

The President and Vice-Chancellor, Professor Peter Mathieson, and Dean, Faculty of Arts, Professor Derek Collins have joined the celebration of the Arts at HKU with The Shaw Foundation on May 22, 2017.

This event is an opportunity for the Faculty to celebrate and express its thanks to The Shaw Foundation for its wonderful new home on the Centennial Campus – Run Run Shaw Tower. It will feature a special performance of Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988) written especially for this occasion by HKU composer Gordon Fung Dic-lun and performed by students from the Music Department’s Advanced Music Performance course.

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

Starry is the Night (dir. Ann Hui, 1988)

For more details about Ann Hui, please visit >>here<<


2017 Oak Fellow: Jinyan Zeng (ColbyNow)

Source: https://www.colby.edu/now/announcements/2017-oak-fellow-jinyan-zeng/

2017 Oak Fellow: Jinyan Zeng

Jinyan Zeng, a Chinese filmmaker, blogger, activist, and scholar, is coming to Waterville in August as the 2017 Oak Human Rights Fellow. This is the first time in its nearly 20-year history that the Oak Institute for Human Rights has selected someone from the People’s Republic of China.

Oak and Colby are thrilled to host Ms. Zeng, who has a remarkable set of skills — academic intelligence, artistic creativity, and profound courage. Her presence on campus will allow us to learn more about the human rights situation in China and explore the power of documentary film to shake up the status quo.

Zeng has spent more than a decade and a half fighting for people with HIV-AIDS, women facing discrimination, factory workers suffering exploitation, a natural environment threatened by pollution, and political dissidents experiencing repression. This work sometimes upsets the Chinese party-state, which at different times has detained and surveilled her. Continue reading


MOOC: Melodramas of Migration: Mabel Cheung Yuen Ting’s An Autumn’s Tale

MOOC: Melodramas of Migration: Mabel Cheung Yuen Ting’s An Autumn’s Tale

Women directors may be in the minority in the Hong Kong film industry; however, they contribute enormously to the artistic quality and popular appeal of the territory’s cinema globally.  In the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), Hong Kong Cinema Through a Global Lens, Dr. Stacilee Ford looks at Mabel Cheung’s An Autumn’s Tale from a feminist perspective.  Drawing on her monograph published by Hong Kong University Press, Dr. Ford examines the “intersectional” nature of gender, race, and immigration in this classic film starring Cherie Chung and Chow Yun-fat.

To sign up for the MOOC, go to  https://www.edx.org/course/hong-kong-cinema-through-global-lens-hkux-hku06-1x  It takes less than five minutes to register; it’s free; and, each person enrolled helps us show worldwide interest in Hong Kong film as a topic.  The unit on An Autumn’s Tale opens online on Tuesday, February 21, 2017.

For more information on Hong Kong women filmmakers, visit Hong Kong Women Filmmakers since 1997, https://hkwomenfilmmakers.wordpress.com/

If you have any questions about the MOOC, fee free to contact us at mwwf@hku.hk.

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