Call For Papers – Decolonising Film and Screen Studies

Call For Papers

Decolonising Film and Screen Studies

A Screen Worlds Open Access edited volume

“… you cannot mobilize a movement that is only and always against; you must have a positive alternative, a vision of a better future that can motivate people to sacrifice their time and energy toward its realization.”

Obioma Nnaemeka, “Nego-feminism: Theorizing, Practicing, and Pruning Africa’s Way”, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society,29.2 (2003), p.364

Inspired by the RhodesMustFall movement at the University of Cape Town in May 2015, certain higher education institutions, individuals and collectives across the world have engaged in renewed, contemporary work to try to decolonise academia over the past four years. These movements are not new, and need to be historicised in relation to the long history of struggles for political decolonisation, complex engagement with the word “decolonisation” itself, and a wealth of significant theorising around decolonising (e.g. wa Thiong’o 1986, Tuhiwai Smith 1999). These contemporary movements are also not uncontested, with some arguing that the term “decolonisation” has provided a useful way of bringing together academics from different disciplines with similar agendas around transformation, and others arguing that the term hides a range of distinct activities and practices, some of which appropriate or exploit the term without real commitment to fostering change.

In this Open Access edited volume which forms part of the “Screen Worlds: Decolonising Film and Screen Studies” project, we seek to put the field of Film and Screen Studies into conversation with these contemporary, cross-disciplinary debates and discussions. Despite the complexities of defining “decolonisation”, particularly in relation to distinct contexts, we feel that this is an urgent conversation for Film and Screen Studies given how Eurocentric the field remains, half a century after its academic formalisation. While an important body of research has been published since the late 1980s on African cinema (e.g. Diawara 1992, Ukadike 1994), Black cinema (e.g. Cham and Andrade-Watkins 1988, hooks 1996), postcolonial cinema and media (e.g. Shohat and Stam 1994), and on de-westernising film studies (e.g. Higbee and Bâ 2012), a large proportion of Film and Screen Studies scholarship continues to ignore continental Africa, much of Asia, research in languages other than English, and questions of diverse cultures and worldviews. For example, Braudy and Cohen’s Film Theory and Criticism (2009), often used as a Film Studies textbook and now in its seventh edition, includes only four entries that deal with critical race theory and/or (post)colonialism (Diawara, Stam and Spence, Yoshimoto, Dissanayake), and these are placed towards the end of the book, suggesting that imperialism, colonialism and racism are an afterthought when it comes to the histories and theories of filmmaking.

As Robert Stam powerfully notes in Film Theory: An Introduction (2000), film’s historical relationship with imperialism, colonialism and racism has been the least studied area in Film and Screen Studies. This is in spite of the fact that the film medium, since its invention in the late 1800s, was powered by White patriarchal privilege and negative representations of dark-skinned peoples. Since racism has been a form of visual supremacy it makes sense to explore its origins, effects, and legacies through a visual medium such as film itself, which was invented during the Scramble for Africa. Film and Screen Studies thus needs to be rethought in relation to imperialism, colonialism, and racism. This volume calls for scholars from all disciplines and in diverse locations around the world to help in this ambitious task of re-envisioning Film and Screen Studies to make the field far more globally representative and inclusive of diverse and dynamic screen cultures and worldviews.

The fact that Film and Screen Studies has had to struggle for recognition as an academic discipline in its own right has led to a versatility and dynamism that we hope means that the field will more easily be able to take inspiration from, and adapt, decolonising debates, methods and theories from other disciplinary fields (e.g. Archaeology, Anthropology, Education Studies, International Relations, Development Studies, Gender Studies, and even Medicine and the Natural Sciences) while shedding light on how films and film theory can also help other academic fields to decolonise. We encourage contributors to read widely across disciplines for inspiration, and we also encourage contributors to foreground their own positionality and lived experience, as well as to reflect on the relationships between their research, pedagogy and/or practice (e.g. hooks 1996, Nnaemeka 2003, Mistry 2017).

Questions that might be explored (although this list is by no means exhaustive) include:

·         What are the possibilities and problems of trying to decolonise Film and Screen Studies?

·         What would a decolonised Film and Screen Studies programme look like? Which films and scholarship should be included, and how? And how might this vary, given that decolonising has different meanings in diverse local, national, regional and continental contexts?

·         How can we ensure that the inclusion of films and film theory by people of colour in Film and Screen Studies is not tokenistic but integral to the re-envisioning of the whole field?

·         What are the obstacles (institutional, political, economic, and cultural) that might inhibit fully decolonised Film and Screen Studies programmes and why?

·         How can we embrace the diversity of languages in films in the ways that we research, teach and write about films? In other words, how can we extend our work beyond English?

·         How can foregrounding our lived experiences and intersectional identities (cf. Walker 1983, Christian 1985, Crenshaw 1989, hooks 1994) change the ways we engage with Film and Screen Studies research, teaching, and filmmaking practice?

·         How can theoretical/critical Film and Screen Studies programmes and practice-based Filmmaking programmes in Higher Education institutions help one another to decolonise?  

·         What can Film and Screen Studies learn from how other fields and disciplines have been decolonising, and vice versa?

In line with our understanding that decolonisation, in any context, is a deeply affective and complex process, we welcome different methodologies, from practical case studies to theoretically or empirically informed arguments to creative responses. We welcome the inclusion of quotations in different languages although please provide English translations. Please email paper proposals of 500 words, and a biography of 200 words, by 30 April 2020 to Professor Lindiwe Dovey at LD18@SOAS.AC.UKPotential contributors will be notified by 30 June 2020 as to whether or not their proposal has been selected. For those selected, full papers will be due by 30 June 2021. 

Call for Abstracts – Global Screen Worlds: An International Workshop

Call for Abstracts
Global Screen Worlds: An International Workshop
SOAS University of London, UK

September 2021

“Comparative film studies…must necessarily proceed by way of a collaboration between intellectuals from different geo-historical formations. The precondition for such a collaboration is that the participants should be prepared to consider their own intellectual formations and thought-habits as symptomatic constellations shaped by the very same dynamics that animate historicity itself.”
Paul Willemen, “For a comparative film studies”, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies 6.1 (2005): 99

“We need to forge ‘off-centered’ networks of individual scholars, academic programs and institutions, and venues for publication internationally.  The final goal is not to create a globally unified discursive space of film studies, but to forge new networks and channels of communication.”
Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto, “A future of comparative film studies”, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies 14.1 (2013): 54-61

In September 2021, a three-day, fully-funded workshop will be held at SOAS University of London as part of the ERC-funded project “Screen Worlds: Decolonising Film and Screen Studies”. This workshop will form part of the “Global Screen Worlds” strand of the project which – inspired by Willemen’s and Yoshimoto’s words above – calls for comparative, interdisciplinary and “off-centered” approaches to Film and Screen Studies. The workshop and the Open Access edited volume that will result from it are, accordingly, designed to inspire and facilitate collaborative dialogue, research, and authorship among Film and Screen scholars from different parts of the world, but especially from Africa, Asia, and Latin America, and those working on indigenous cinemas.

Film and Screen Studies still largely situates itself within an Anglo-American, European framework. This workshop wants to contribute to work that takes the field beyond this geographical bias by developing new frameworks and methodologies that foreground how the specific histories, languages, politics and cultures of particular places shape and interact with narrative screen media. Rather than the top-down nature of a “world cinema” approach – in which one, lone scholar attempts to be an expert on multiple film cultures – we encourage a grassroots approach in which we will seek to move towards more universal understandings of “global screen worlds” from the specific and particular. The way we aim to do this is by inviting participants to ‘pair up’ with other screen scholars with similar interests but working from or on very different places to co-author work that brings “screen worlds” from two or more diverse contexts into conversation without losing local specificity. We recognise that this is a highly ambitious undertaking and we will offer support with ‘pairing up’ to those eager to participate but who do not have scholarly contacts in other regions.

In the workshop and edited volume we want to explore and compare diegetic screen worlds within films, and also how industrial screen worlds operate (i.e. modes of film production, distribution and exhibition). We seek proposals that aim to pay attention to diegetic similarities, differences and/or significant affinities across narrative screen texts from two or more particular contexts, and/or study actual screen connections (in line with critical transnational cinema studies, cf. Higbee and Lim 2010) or parallel screen histories (e.g. how two distinct regional cinemas that have not interacted have nevertheless had similar experiences). We are interested in comparative analyses that cover, for example, issues of stardom, genre, and melodrama; the films and experiences of female and/or LGBTQ+ filmmakers; themes related to intersectional identities (race, gender, class, ability); the roles of film festivals and “live” cinematic events such as premieres; how video-on-demand platforms and/or the “televisual turn” is affecting the creation, circulation and consumption of narrative screen media; cross-cultural representation (e.g. how Africans are represented in Asian films and vice versa); modes of working with sound and music, as well as issues of subtitling, dubbing and live ‘voicing’ in cinema; the use of narrative screen media (including creative documentaries) within movements for social change and justice; and self-reflexive and autobiographical modes of filmmaking.

Specific questions we are interested in exploring include, but are certainly not limited to:
–    What can be achieved through comparative analysis of experimental cinema in Senegal and Palestine in the 1970s, or of contemporary science fiction cinema in Kenya and Palestine?
–    How can thinking about the work of Wong Kar Wai (Hong Kong) and Mahamat Saleh Haroun (Chad) help us to explore the overlaps between arthouse and popular cinema?
–    Given that many African and Asian filmmakers were trained in the Soviet Union, what impact has this had upon their work?
–    Why have Bollywood and South Korean drama been so popular in certain parts of Africa?
–    Why, in a global context of a shift to online film viewing, has there been a recent increase in cinema-building and cinema-going in places such as Ethiopia and Pakistan?
–    Why has China become so interested in representing Africa in its diegetic screen worlds and in contributing to industrial screen worlds in Africa through investment in Chinese film festivals and Chinese television stations in Africa?
–    How are video on demand platforms such as GagaooLaLa, V-Live, ALT Balaji, BigFlix, Oksusu, Voot, Pooq, iflix, and Qiyi changing the forms and routes of screen media?
–    Do terms such as “world cinema” or “transnational cinema” remain important categories of analysis when it comes to contemporary screen media and why/why not? 

All submissions will need to engage, in some way, with the concept of “screen worlds”, which we put forward as a heuristic device to encourage creative, provocative approaches in relation to screen media. We strongly encourage submissions from both established and early career researchers. Participants must, however, be interested in working closely in a collaborative, supportive way with one or more co-author(s), with other workshop participants, and with the editors.
Submissions need to include:
i)    An abstract of 500 words (highlighting whether you wish to be ‘paired up’ by us with a scholar from a different region)
ii)    A statement of 500 words about why you are interested in participating
iii)    A biography of 300 words
Deadline for abstract submissions: 15 February 2020

Submit to: Professor Lindiwe Dovey (LD18@soas.ac.uk) and Professor Kate Taylor-Jones (k.e.taylor-jones@sheffield.ac.uk)
Please note: we will notify you by 15 March 2020 as to whether we are interested in your abstract. If we are, we will expect a full chapter draft of 6-8,000 words by 15 February 2021. Final decisions about who is selected for the workshop will depend on the quality of these drafts. All transport, accommodation, visa, and meal costs will be fully covered for selected participants. Please note that, in addition to workshopping the chapters during event, there will be several inspiring keynote presentations by leading international screen media scholars, practitioners and creative researchers.

This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. 819236).

[EXTENDED DEADLINE 31 DEC 2019] CFP Paper Submissions: Asian Women Filmmakers on Global Screens: Networks, Circuits, and Community Connections (27-28 March 2020)

March 27 and 28, 2020
Center for the Study of Globalization and Cultures, Faculty of Arts, University of Hong Kong

Women filmmakers are severely underrepresented in general film distribution (theatrical and auxiliary), film festivals and awards: a phenomenon that adversely affects the visibility of female filmmakers from Asia. However, there has been little concrete investigation into the mechanisms that underpin the status quo. Through engaging international specialists on women in film, this conference seeks to dissect the system, pinpoint the weak spots and identify a possible remedial course of action toward improving the situation of women filmmakers.  The goal of our conversation will not only be to increase knowledge on these matters but to make practical recommendations to the film industry, film festivals, and other institutions.

This conference brings together academics and practitioners to create the opportunity for engagement between communities within the Asian region and beyond. Our objective with this conference is to bring together female academics and practitioners (many of whom have academic credentials as well) for a discussion that focuses on the pitfalls in women’s careers in cinema, aims to identify specific problem areas, and produces concrete remedial recommendations that will then be disseminated to the wider international community.

This follows our successful local summit devoted to women in Hong Kong film higher education (November 2018) and a follow-up on HeForShe male allies (May 2019).  In addition, it supplements information on our website/database devoted to Hong Kong women filmmakers active since 1997(https://hkwomenfilmmakers.wordpress.com/) as well as our directory (https://sites.google.com/view/hkwfhighered/home) on men and women involved in promoting gender equality in film education in Hong Kong.

Professor Dina Iordanova, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and Professor Soyoung Kim, Korea National University of the Arts will deliver keynote speeches. In addition, Meaghan Morris, Professor of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney will be our special guest.

If you would like to present a paper, please send us a title, 250-word abstract, brief bio, and contact information by December 31, 2019. We also welcome self-nominations for delegates to the conference. We are, unfortunately, unable to provide travel and accommodation; however, there is no registration fee and some meals/refreshments will be provided for registered participants.

All correspondence should be sent to Gina Marchetti and Christine Vicera at viceracn@hku.hk with “Asian Women Filmmakers 2020 (Paper)” in the subject line. We will send out notifications of acceptance by January 15, 2020, and open registration after that date. 

CFP: ‘Gendering Screen Industries: Representation, Working Conditions and Agency’

GWO, University of Kent, UK, 24-26 June, 2020

‘Gendering Screen Industries: Representation, Working Conditions and Agency’

This stream addresses issues of gender, feminism and sexualities in the film and television industries. We welcome a broad range of papers analyzing gendered working conditions, women’s presence, the portrayal of gender relations on screen, gender equality policies, and/or women/feminist organizing in the film and television industries. The stream seeks to broaden the conversations regarding screen industries, and encourage scholars from different disciplines to submit their papers. We also welcome a variety of theoretical approaches, including feminist, intersectional or postcolonial approaches.

There is no doubt film and television produce some of the most influential cultural expressions of our time, and that films and television programmes reflect and mold our understanding of society. It is thus crucial to ask questions about how screen industries are gendered and produce gendered outcomes. In many countries gender equality and diversity in screen industries has been put on the policy agenda (see e.g. EWA 2015; O’Brien 2019; Sink & Mastro 2017). Despite efforts to improve women’s conditions, the #metoo-movement revealed how screen industries are entrenched by sexism. In addition, gender gaps in wages and production budgets, gender separated networks and gender discrimination are continuously being reported (SFI 2018; Gurgulis & Stoyanova, 2012; Jansson 2016). The film industry has for a long time been dominated by men, and women who have entered the industry often experience a macho working environment. Further, industry ideals of being constantly available and extremely flexible makes it difficult for women to maintain a work/life balance (Liddy, fc; Dahlström & Hermelin 2000).

In the mid 2010 the Bechdel-test became popular in (see Koivunen et al 2013). While the Bechdel-test has been criticized, it renewed and popularized the debate regarding the portrayal of women and gender relations on screen. In an on-line article Walt Hickey (2014) used the Bechdel-test to conclude that Hollywood makes more films without named women actors than films with two women speaking to each other. Meanwhile, scholars have used theories of post-feminism to analyze how film and television appropriates feminism to portray gender relations in ways that fit into a neoliberal paradigm (see e.g.Tasker & Negra 2007; Gill 2017).

The growing commercialization of film and television is bolstered by the increasingly transnational character of screen industries due to the new distribution windows that have emerged. Further, the number of co-production arrangements involving funding from several countries are rising, and transnational production companies, including 26 actors such as Netflix and HBO, have become more important for funding productions. In the current situation, nations previously focusing on supporting domestic film production, compete to attract productions from other countries. What gendered consequences these developments have is still a largely unexplored area of research.

The stream welcome papers on topics including, but not limited to:

• Gender equality policies and efforts related to screen industries

• Gender and globalization, regionalization and localization of screen industries

• Gender, management and leadership in screen industries

• The organization of work and working conditions in screen industries

• Women’s work experiences in the screen industries

• Screen work and motherhood

• Women screen workers and ageism

• Gender, diversity and intersectionality and screen industries

• Women film/TV workers and sexual harassment

• Women’s organizing in screen industries

• The portrayal of women/gender relations etc. in film and television

• Expressions of feminist/feminine cinécriture

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (submitted direct to stream leaders, ONE page, WORD NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding any references, no headers, footers or track changes) are invited by Friday 1st November 2019

Decisions on acceptance of abstracts will be made by stream leaders within one month and communicated to authors by Monday 2nd December 2019

All contributions will be independently refereed. Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. Abstracts should be emailed to Maria Jansson: maria.jansson@statsvet.su.se

CFP: Cine-feminisms and the Academy Symposium


UNSW Sydney, 12-13th December 2019


The contemporary media landscape is shaped by increasing precarity and awareness of gendered issues. The global screen industry is grappling with the cultural and industrial shifts precipitated by the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. For some, the Harvey Weinstein revelations and subsequent scandal resulted in a re-evaluation of the gendered operation of Hollywood. The industry has responded on the red carpet, through the media and in film festival juries. What role do – and can – forms of film feminisms (or cine-feminism) play within this context?

This symposium will explore questions around the state, place and forms of contemporary cine-feminisms. There is little question that women’s filmmaking is gaining new currency and profile in film festivals, in film funding and in academic publishing. Calls for greater gender equity in the film industry are resulting in shifts in the ways (some) film funding bodies allocate resources and in how (some) film festivals select and program work. Decades of lobbying by women working both within and on the margins of the film industry have been the driving force in creating these shifts, often in engagement with the long history of feminist film scholarship on the work of women behind the camera, in front of the camera, and in front of the screen. The recent commitments to greater gender equity in the film industry can also, of course, be understood as one way that the industry has responded to negative publicity (in particular, the high-profile cases of sexual harassment, sexual!
  assault and gender-based discrimination that have captured public attention) and economic opportunity (targeting female viewers).


While this (re)newed interest in women’s filmmaking has been enabled by cine-feminisms to what extent and in what ways does – or can – it create opportunities for feminist teaching and research in the academy? What place does cine-feminism have in the academy today? When, where and how does it shape and inform how both film history and film theory are understood and taught and how questions of authorship, genre, performance, intermediality, and industry are explored? In the shifting university sector, are there particular issues that cine-feminist work bumps up against in terms of syllabus design, recognition of engagement and outreach, research funding and publications?

We invite proposals on any area related to cine-feminisms/film feminisms, including but not limited to:

        • Contemporary and historical cine- and media feminisms
        • Feminist screen theories and pedagogy
        • “Doing” feminist screen studies
        • Feminist cine-activisms – on screen, online, in press, on the streets
        • Diverse feminist screen cultures in the digital age

Keynote will be delivered by Dr Anna Backman Rogers (University of Gothenberg, Sweden)

Dr Anna Backman Rogers is a Senior Lecturer in Feminism and Visual Culture at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She is the author of American Independent Cinema: Rites of Passage and The Crisis Image (Edinburgh UP, 2015) and Sofia Coppola: The Politics of Visual Pleasure (Berghahn 2018). She is also the co-editor with Laura Mulvey of Feminisms (Amsterdam UP, 2015) and the co-editor with Boel Ulfsdotter of Female Authorship and the Documentary Image: Theory, Practice and Aesthetics and Female Agency and Documentary Strategies: Subjectivities, Identity, and Activism (both with Edinburgh UP, 2017). Her current research is on the films of Lynne Ramsay and Barbara Loden’s WANDA.

CFP closes 13th of September 2019. Please send your proposals including a title, an abstract (250 words), and a short biography (80 words) to Dr Jessica Ford jessica.ford@newcastle.edu.au  and Dr Jodi Brooks j.brooks@unsw.edu.au by 13th of September 2019.

CFP: The Journal of Screenwriting

The Journal of Screenwriting is calling for articles for a special issue with a focus on female screenwriters, to be published in August/September 2020.

The Journal wants to emphasize the importance of female screenwriters across eras, genres, mediums. This importance may arise from an analysis of bodies of work, from individual scripts written by women, or from case studies where female screenwriters have worked collaboratively to express screen stories. Articles may also include women’s work behind the scenes in advocating for/promoting greater gender equality within screenwriting milieux. Articles on female screenwriters from diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

Articles may include (but are not limited to) the following topics:

  • Female screenwriters in silent cinema
  • The influence of female writer(-directors) in contemporary culture
  • Case studies on individual screenwriter’s work, collaborations between women, or on how women-centred stories have been brought to the screen
  • Historiography of manuals and screenwriting pedagogy where this reflects the work of female screenwriters
  • National and global tendencies with regard to women within screenwriting – relations, influences, cultural transfers
  • Censorship and women’s stories and women’s writings
  • Biographies of female screenwriters of any era
  • Female screenwriters within writing partnerships
  • The work of female screenwriters within script production (e.g. as showrunners, script editors or consultants)
  • The question of a female voice within screenwriting

In the first instance, please email abstracts of up to 400 words and a short biography, no later than Friday October 4, 2019 to both of the editors of this special issue:

Rosanne Welch: rosanne@welchwrite.com

Rose Ferrell: rosieglow@westnet.com.au

Completed articles of between 4000 and 8000 words should be sent by end January 2020 via the Journal of Screenwriting’s web page, where you can also access information on the journal’s house style:

https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-journal,id=182/

Peer review and acceptance/rejection will be completed by end of May 2020. Rewrites will be due by end of July 2020.

The Journal of Screenwriting is an international peer-reviewed journal published three times annually by Intellect, and is abstracted and indexed by Thomson Reuters: ISI Web of Knowledge, MLA and FIAF. It explores the nature of writing for the screen image; this includes not only writing for film and television but also computer games and animation. The journal highlights current academic and professional thinking about the screenplay and intends to promote, stimulate and bring together current research and contemporary debates around the screenplay whilst encouraging groundbreaking research in an international arena. The journal is discursive, critical, rigorous and engages with issues in a dynamic and developing field, linking academic theory to screenwriting practice.

CFPs: Flow Volume 26 Special Issue: “New Faces, New Voices, New Bodies: Current Thoughts on Media Representations”

The summer of 2019 has seen a variety of news reports and stories
announcing and celebrating the accomplishments of diversity, inclusivity,
and socio-political progress across the entertainment industries. Examples
include Ali Stroker’s monumental win at the Tony Awards (as the first
wheelchair user to win an award); the casting of Halle Bailey in Disney’s
live-adaptation of The Little Mermaid; Marvel Studios’ casting of Simu Liu,
Salma Hayek, and Mahershala Ali in lead roles as well as the hiring of
non-white and non-male directors for Phase 4 projects; the announcement
that the 007 role in the James Bond franchise will now be played by Black
woman, Lashana Lynch; the development and production of a queer-centered superhero television series in the upcoming Batwoman on The CW; and the critically-acclaimed and fan-lauded careers of musicians like Lil Nas X and Lizzo taking center stage in the music industry.

This inaugural issue of Flow’s twenty-sixth volume, “New Faces, New Voices, New Bodies: Current Thoughts on Media Representations,” asks cultural and media scholars to consider these recent developments from historical, industrial, political, economic, cultural, and national lenses. Arguably, this phenomenon has occurred before (to name a few, the ‘70s with Blaxploitation, socially “relevant” TV programming, and the popular embrace of funk and soul; the late ‘80s and early ‘90s with Hollywood’s New Black Wave, the flood of Black sitcoms on network television, and the mainstream success of hip-hop and rap; and the late ‘90s and early ‘00s with the rise of Latinx stars in pop music, “multiculti” ensemble casts, and the appearance of LGBTQ characters  in primetime). This special issue seeks to understand: What is new about this moment? How can we discuss these
developments without losing sight of the economic motives of conglomerates?


How can we define and discuss this current wave of diversity, inclusivity,
and progressive action in the industries? And to what extent are these
industry strategies of diversity and inclusivity sustainable? Possible
topics include, but are by no means limited to:

  LGBTQ identities in contemporary fiction and non-fiction media
  –

  Effects of trailblazing texts and figures on the media industry
  –

  Discourses of authenticity, sincerity, progress, and pandering
  –

  Late-night television, political comedy, and the Trump administration
  –

  Cultural and political responses to casting and production announcements
  –

  Genre-specific examinations of identity and representation
  –

  Comparative analyses of historical precedents and contemporary
  resurgences
  –

  Conglomeration, technology, and regulation as pressure points for
  diversity and inclusivity, particularly in corporate diversity initiatives
  and campaigns
  –

  Global perspectives of identity and representation

To be considered for this timely issue, please submit a completed short
essay of 1200-1500 words, along with at least three images (.png), video,
and/or new media files (GIFs, etc.), and a short bio, to Rusty Hatchell and
Selena Dickey at flowjournaleditors@gmail.com <floweditors@gmail.com>
by Monday,
August 26th, 2019. The Special Issue will be published at flowjournal.org
<http://www.flowjournal.org/> on Monday, September 16th, 2019.

CFP: Doing Women’s Film & Television History conference

We are inviting submissions for individual papers or panels at the Doing Women’s Film & Television History conference taking place on 20th-22nd May, 2020, Maynooth University, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland.

Keynote: Kasandra O’Connell, Irish Film Archive

The fifth biennial Doing Women’s Film & Television History conference invites proposals from researchers and practitioners engaged in the exploration, uncovering, archiving and dissemination of women’s roles in film and television, as well as wider media, both in the past and today. The theme of this conference – ‘Forming Histories/ Histories in Formation’ – aims to foreground issues pertaining to the production, curation and archiving of women’s histories in film and television as well as the methods for, and approaches to, producing and shaping these histories as they form. More particularly, much can be learned from the diversity of practices, experiences and narratives of women’s film and television history as they pertain to:  national, transnational, world and global histories; neglected, peripheral or hidden histories; organisations such as museums, archives and universities; collectives, groups and movements such as #MeToo; local communities and community media; emergent forms and platforms; and historical approaches to women’s reception of film and television as well as historicising current practices and experiences of reception, fandom and consumption.

This three-day conference casts the net wide so that it can capture a range of experiences, practices, industries, nationalities and voices that are situated in relation to women and their histories. The conference provides a platform for those working in and researching film, television and media more generally as well as those invested in the production of these histories and narratives of the past and as they materialise. 

We invite papers that can provide added richness to the theme of ‘Women in Film & Television,’ and are, in addition, especially interested in the following areas:

•    International and comparative perspectives on women in film and television
•    Histories of women’s creative practice, production and technical work and film/cinema and television work more generally in various national, regional, or local contexts; transnational film and television; migration and diasporas
•    Approaches to histories of women’s indigenous production, including Third Cinema and grassroots film and television production
•    Representations of women in historical film and television
•    Female audiences, reception, fandom of film and television
•    Considerations of methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of women in film and television and their audiences
•    Archival research methods and approaches including feminist archiving practices
•    Use of recently established or historically neglected women’s media archives
•    Artefacts and ephemera in women’s archives: moving image, photographic and digital media, scripts, merchandise, etc. 
•    Considerations of how gender intersects with race, class, ethnicity, in relation to film and television production, reception or representation
•    Revisiting production and labour through the lens of #MeToo and #TimesUp, including historical formations of, and historicising, such movements
•    Changing meanings of women and womanhood as reflected and shaped by the interventions of women in film and television as producers, critics, and campaigners.
•    Teaching women’s film and television history; feminist pedagogies; the politics of education and training; women’s experiences of moving from education to employment in film and television

We welcome papers on subjects outside of these areas and that enhance the interpretations and meanings of ‘Doing Women’s Film & Television History.’

Please submit proposals of 250 words along with the paper’s title and a 50-word biography. Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes, including clips and images. We welcome pre-constituted panels of three to four presenters (with panel title and abstract of 150 words), proposals for roundtables or workshops and presentations from researchers, practitioners, creatives and industry professionals. Deadline for proposals Oct 11th 2019. Email: dwfthv@gmail.com

We are pleased to make available a number of bursaries for Irish and international postgraduate students, early career researchers (within one-year of permanent contract) and those on part-time or zero-hour contracts. These will help support travel and accommodation to the conference. In order to apply, please submit to dwfthv@gmail.com a 250-word abstract along with a 300-word statement that includes: an indication of the relevance of your paper to the conference themes; reference to the intended output of the research; details of your current employment/student status. The deadline is Oct 11th 2019 and please use “Bursary application” in the subject line.

Hosted by
Department of Media Studies, Maynooth University
Women’s Film and Television History Network- UK/Ire

Organising and programming committee
Mary Immaculate College, Limerick
Maynooth University
Queen’s University Belfast
University College Cork
University College Dublin

CFP: Cine-feminisms and the Academy Symposium

by Elif Sendur
UNSW Sydney, 12-13th December 2019

The contemporary media landscape is shaped by increasing precarity and awareness of gendered issues. The global screen industry is grappling with the cultural and industrial shifts precipitated by the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. For some, the Harvey Weinstein revelations and subsequent scandal resulted in a re-evaluation of the gendered operation of Hollywood. The industry has responded on the red carpet, through the media and in film festival juries. What role do – and can – forms of film feminisms (or cine-feminism) play within this context?

This symposium will explore questions around the state, place and forms of contemporary cine-feminisms. There is little question that women’s filmmaking is gaining new currency and profile in film festivals, in film funding and in academic publishing. Calls for greater gender equity in the film industry are resulting in shifts in the ways (some) film funding bodies allocate resources and in how (some) film festivals select and program work. Decades of lobbying by women working both within and on the margins of the film industry have been the driving force in creating these shifts, often in engagement with the long history of feminist film scholarship on the work of women behind the camera, in front of the camera, and in front of the screen. The recent commitments to greater gender equity in the film industry can also, of course, be understood as one way that the industry has responded to negative publicity (in particular, the high-profile cases of sexual harassment, sexual assault and gender-based discrimination that have captured public attention) and economic opportunity (targeting female viewers).

While this (re)newed interest in women’s filmmaking has been enabled by cine-feminisms to what extent and in what ways does – or can – it create opportunities for feminist teaching and research in the academy? What place does cine-feminism have in the academy today? When, where and how does it shape and inform how both film history and film theory are understood and taught and how questions of authorship, genre, performance, intermediality, and industry are explored? In the shifting university sector, are there particular issues that cine-feminist work bumps up against in terms of syllabus design, recognition of engagement and outreach, research funding and publications?

We invite proposals on any area related to cine-feminisms/film feminisms, including but not limited to:

Contemporary and historical cine- and media feminisms
Feminist screen theories and pedagogy
“Doing” feminist screen studies
Feminist cine-activisms – on screen, online, in press, on the streets
Diverse feminist screen cultures in the digital age
Keynote will be delivered by Dr Anna Backman Rogers (University of Gothenberg, Sweden)

Dr Anna Backman Rogers is a Senior Lecturer in Feminism and Visual Culture at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She is the author of American Independent Cinema: Rites of Passage and The Crisis Image (Edinburgh UP, 2015) and Sofia Coppola: The Politics of Visual Pleasure (Berghahn 2018). She is also the co-editor with Laura Mulvey of Feminisms (Amsterdam UP, 2015) and the co-editor with Boel Ulfsdotter of Female Authorship and the Documentary Image: Theory, Practice and Aesthetics and Female Agency and Documentary Strategies: Subjectivities, Identity, and Activism (both with Edinburgh UP, 2017). Her current research is on the films of Lynne Ramsay and Barbara Loden’s WANDA. 

CFP closes 13th of September 2019. Please send your proposals including a title, an abstract (250 words), and a short biography (80 words) to Dr Jessica Ford jessica.ford@newcastle.edu.au  and Dr Jodi Brooks j.brooks@unsw.edu.au by 13th of September 2019.

CFP: Global TV Images of Female Masculinity

CFP: Roundtable “Global TV Images of Female Masculinity” at 2020 SCMS Conference, Denver, USA
(proposal deadline August 5th, 2019)

Roundtable Theme:

Global TV Images of Female Masculinity

Chair(s):

Co-chaired by Jamie J. ZHAO (XJTLU) and Eve NG (Ohio U)

Call:

In recent years, TV representations of female masculinity have proliferated and diversified worldwide. Notable examples include the white lesbian landowner Anne Lister in the historical drama Gentleman Jack (BBC/HBO, UK/USA, 2019-), the African American lesbian Denise in the web series Master of None (Netflix, USA, 2015-2017), the tomboyish participants of the reality singing competition Super Girls’ Voice (HTV, China, 2004-2016), the cross-dressing female protagonist raised as a boy in the drama Bromance (SETTV, Taiwan, 2015-2016), and the butch lesbian beauty contest segment, “That’s My Tomboy,” in the Philippine daytime variety show It’s Showtime (ABS-CBN, Philippines, 2009-).

Along with this surge in masculine female TV culture, there has been a growing body of scholarly literature on media and public imaginaries of female masculinity in different geo-locales since the late 1990s. Jack Halberstam famously noted that “far from being an imitation of maleness,” female masculinity is one of many “alternative masculinities” that manifests a continuum of various masculine traits and identities embodied or enacted by cis-females, such as tomboyism and butchness, the definitions and calibration of which are often socioculturally and racially modelled (1998, 1). In various forms of contemporary media, tomboyism is often understood as “an extended childhood period of female masculinity” (Halberstam 1998, 5), or a female “masculine gender identification” that may be “visibly reminiscent” of a passing, youthful (though not necessarily nonheterosexual) identity for female audiences (Kam 2014; Martin 2010).

Moreover, the culturally specific understandings and imaginaries of masculinities embodied by cis-females have been important threads in world gender studies and global queering theory. For instance, Halberstam’s research reveals the discrepancy between recognizable American rural and urban female masculinities (1998, 57-58). Audrey Yue’s research on Asian drag kings in Australia also illustrates that compared to normative Western butchness, the diasporic Asian butch “situated in an Anglo-dominated lesbian scene is simply not … masculine enough” (2008, 261-262). In addition, as Helen Leung remarks, the unique historical trajectory of Mainland Chinese female androgyny, as well as the social tolerance (with patriarchy and homophobia in essence) and trivialization of female homosexuality in modern and contemporary China, made invisible local masculine lesbian identities and gendered expressions (2002, 129).

With a specific focus on global TV in the 2010s, we intend this roundtable to initiate a productive conversation about the variety of ways in which female masculinity has been imagined, idealized, troubled, deconstructed, and remodified on contemporary TV, and the relation of these representations to the sociocultural contexts from which they emerge. We aim to explore the following questions: How are TV images of female masculinity constructed through negotiation with local, transregional, and global media and public discourses? How and why can TV imaginaries of female masculinity in certain sociocultural contexts be linked to, or decoupled from, female heterosexuality/homosexuality? In what ways can ethnicity, class, and geopolitics complicate TV representations of female masculinity? Talk proposals dedicated to non-Anglo-American cultures from a de-Western-centric perspective are especially welcomed.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Tomboys on reality TV
  • Masculine lesbians in TV series
  • Gender-nonnormative or trans female celebrities on TV
  • TV representations of masculine female athletes, warriors, spies, soldiers, or other forms of “heroic,” “aggressive,” or “rebellious” masculinity in women
  • The ways in which gender non-conformity and class in women intersect in TV representations
  • The intersectionality of female masculinity and non-Caucasian, non-Anglophone-speaking identities on TV
  • Cross-dressing female characters and/or drag king culture on TV
  • Televisual imaginaries of heterosexual-identified, masculine women
  • TV framing of gendered differences and subjectivities of masculine and feminine women/lesbians

Please send

1). A short bio (around 75 words), current status, contact email, and affiliation;

2). Presentation title;

3). Presentation abstract (around 350 words) that delineates the focus and/or case studies/examples, analytical angles, preliminary findings, and contribution of your research

by August 5th, 2019 to us at jingjamiezhao@gmail.com and nge@ohio.edu. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by August 13th, 2019. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at the above two email addresses.

Kindly note that SCMS requires roundtable participants to be current members of SCMS at the time of submission.  Membership dues are not refunded to participants of a declined proposal submission. Only one submission (strict one role rule) per person.  

Co-Chair Bios:

Jamie J. Zhao is a global queer media scholar and currently Assistant Professor of Communications at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (University of Liverpool, China campus). She holds a PhD in Gender Studies from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and another PhD in Film and TV Studies from the University of Warwick. She coedited HK University Press’s 2017 anthology, Boys’ Love, Cosplay, and Androgynous Idols: Queer Fan Cultures in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

Eve Ng is an associate professor in Media Arts and Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Ohio University. Her research includes work on cultural production and viewer engagement around LGBTQ media, social media and participatory practices, and LGBTQ media and activism in Southeast Asia, and has appeared in Communication, Culture, & CritiqueDevelopment and ChangeFeminist Media Studies,Journal of Film and VideoPopular Communication, and Transformative Works and Culture.

Bibliography:

Halberstam, Judith. 1998. Female Masculinity. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Kam, Lucetta. 2014. “Desiring T, Desiring Self.” Journal of Lesbian Studies 18 (3), 252-65.

Leung, Helen. 2002. “Thoughts on Lesbian Genders in Contemporary Chinese Cultures.” In Femme/Butch: New Considerations of the Way We Want to Go, edited by Michelle Gibson and Deborah T. Meem, 123-33. New York: Harrington Park Press.

Martin, Fran. 2010. Backward Glances: Contemporary Chinese Cultures and the Female Homoerotic Imaginary. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Yue, Audrey. 2008. “King’s Victoria: Asian Drag Kings, Postcolonial Female Masculinity, and Hybrid Sexuality in Australia.” In AsiaPacifiQueer: Rethinking Genders and Sexualities, edited by Fran Martin, Peter Jackson, Mark McLelland, and Audrey Yue, 251-70. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.